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Uber Buys Bike-Sharing Service JUMP

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Uber is officially entering the dockless bike-sharing space. The ride-hail company has acquired electric bike-share startup Jump Bikes for an undisclosed amount. Owning and operating its own bike-share service may help Uber mitigate the threat that e-bike and e-scooter services pose to the ride-hail company’s business, specifically for trips under three or so miles.

Bike services are a more affordable means to complete first- and last-mile trips to Uber’s suite of services. The deal will give Uber users access to Jump services. Jump, founded by Ryan Rzepecki, had raised $11.6 million from investors including Menlo Ventures.

Other ride-share companies around the world already have bike share services. In India, there’s Ola, which offers bike share, and Didi and Grab have launched their own bike-share services. Jump and Uber first began working together in February when Uber began offering some users the option to order a Jump bike in San Francisco.

Jump is the sole dockless bike-share operator currently available in San Francisco. The city has an exclusive contract with Ford’s GoBike for docked bike share. Jump doesn’t require a dock, which means it can be parked almost anywhere. As part of the pilot program, Jump is currently only allowed to operate 250 bikes in the city. Per its permit, the company should be able to double the number of bikes in the city by September.

In January, the company was the only dockless bike service to receive a permit to operate in San Francisco. In February, the first full month of operation, Jump says the company saw around four trips for each of its 250 bikes a day at an average distance of 2.6 miles per trip. Jump, previously called Social Bikes, only recently began operating its own fleet of dockless bikes. Prior to that, it sold dockless bikes to a variety of clients like small fleet operators in more than 40 markets.

Integrating bike sharing into Uber’s platform will enable users to bike to a place where it’s more convenient or cheaper for a driver to pick them up. That’s also true for getting to a destination a car can’t take you conveniently or affordably. Users can plan their ride-share trips around where there are available bikes given the bikes are GPS-enabled.

“At our core, we are still the same team that is passionate about partnering with cities to increase cycling, but joining Uber presents us with the opportunity to realize our dreams faster and at a much larger scale,” Rzepecki said in a statement. “Jump will continue to operate in a way that remains true to our roots and we will remain good partners to cities while delivering excellent service to our riders.”

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Experience the ChatGPT ‘Make It More’ Trend: Generate Weird AI Images

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AI art generators occupy a peculiar space, capable of rendering diverse scenarios, from a cosmic skateboarding dog to a coffee cup adrift in the ocean. Setting aside ethical considerations, some creations may not initially meet expectations, necessitating user prompts to refine the AI-generated output.

Yet, what if the aim isn’t to craft a polished piece of AI art? Enter the “make it more” trend, where ChatGPT users task DALL-E to generate an image and subsequently request the bot to amplify certain aspects. For instance, Justine Moore prompted DALL-E to create a bowl of ramen, then instructed it to make it spicier. The iterative process led to increasingly absurd results, culminating in a bowl of noodles shooting fire beams into outer space.

While the Make It More trend gains traction on ChatGPT and DALL-E, allowing users to experiment with various image transformations, it also raises concerns about resource utilization. The AI processing involved consumes power and energy, prompting considerations about the trend’s efficiency and environmental impact. Nevertheless, these prompts contribute to OpenAI’s ongoing efforts to enhance AI capabilities across platforms like ChatGPT and DALL-E.

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Samsung Internet is Now Available for Download on Windows PCs

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Samsung’s default browser, Samsung Internet, has expanded its reach to desktop computers and laptops, now available for download on the Microsoft Store. One notable feature is the ability for users to sync their browsing data between their Galaxy devices and computers.

Upon launching the browser, users can import their browsing history, bookmarks, and search engines from other applications like Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge by signing into their Samsung Cloud account. The browser also supports add-ons and extensions from Chrome and Edge, accessible through the Chrome Web Store.

Samsung Internet for Windows offers familiar features such as incognito mode, light and dark modes, and ad-blocker support. The design elements show similarities to both Chrome and Edge, providing a sense of familiarity for users of those browsers. A useful security feature allows users to delete bookmarks, browsing history, passwords, and other data upon signing out, catering to those who share computers.

Despite its promising features, the browser’s PC debut is marred by a lack of complete sync support. Currently, only browsing history, bookmarks, and search engines can be imported, with no support for transferring saved passwords from Galaxy devices to computers. This omission may be addressed in future updates.

In May, Samsung Internet received an optimisation update for Galaxy tablet users. Toggleable features were introduced, allowing users to control the placement of the browser’s address, bookmark, and tab bars. The update also included a warning for users with a high number of open tabs, informing them that opening another tab would result in the deletion of the oldest tab.

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Google Clarifies the Cause of Missing Google Drive Files

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Many Google Drive users recently experienced the unsettling disappearance of their files, prompting concerns. Google has now identified the root cause, attributing the issue specifically to the Google Drive for Desktop app. While assuring that only a limited subset of users is affected, the tech giant is actively investigating the matter and promises timely updates.

To prevent inadvertent file deletion, Google provides the following recommendations:

  1. Avoid clicking “Disconnect account” within Drive for desktop.
  2. Refrain from deleting or moving the app data folder, located at:
    • Windows: %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Google\DriveFS
    • macOS: ~/Library/Application Support/Google/DriveFS
  3. Optionally, create a copy of the app data folder if there is sufficient space on your hard drive.

Before Google officially addressed the issue, distressed users took to the company’s support forum to report deleted files. One user from South Korea highlighted a particularly severe case where their account reverted to May 2023, resulting in the loss of anything uploaded or created after that date. Additionally, the user emphasised that they had not synced or shared their files or drive with anyone else.

As Google delves deeper into resolving this matter, affected users are advised to heed the provided precautions. The company’s commitment to ongoing updates reflects its dedication to swiftly addressing and rectifying the situation. The incident serves as a reminder of the importance of proactive measures to safeguard digital data, especially as users navigate cloud-based platforms such as Google Drive.

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